Amazing 2 Single Beds Room Ideas

Usually two single beds are placed in a shared kids bedroom or a guest bedroom. But instead of just putting the beds separately you can be a little more creative and put them at different angles. And even if you put them in the conventional way you can give attention to the walls, the bedding and other decor factors. If you are in search of some good furniture pieces you can buy them at Gum Tree. So, take a look at different ways to decorate a room with 2 single beds in the best possible way:

1. Put Two Storage Single Beds at An Angle and Add a Corner Shelf for Boosting Storage in a Kids’ Room

 

If both the beds of your kids are storage beds then put them at a right angle and fix in a storage unit in the corner space created between the two.

2. For a Room Shared by Two Girls Do it in Pink and White and Add Canopies to The Beds

Image via: crushculdesac

If your girls are more towards the princess like pink bedroom then decorate it in pastel pink with hints of white and hang canopies for a fairy tale feel.

3. For a Guest Bedroom with Wood Ceiling Accent It with Mint Green Walls,White Beds and a Jute Rug for a Breezy Coastal Feel

Image via: houzz

Coastal decor is always a hit when done in the right way. For example this room that is a pure bliss.

4. For a Room Shared by a Girl and a Boy You Can Mark Their Cute Little Zones

Image via: pottery barn kids , woo home

You can also create zones for your kids by decorating in the tried and tested pink and blue combo.

5. Two Beds and One Long and Cozy Tufted Headboard

 

If you want something in the room that can pull focus then install one long tufted headboard. It will not only amp up the style but will also increase the coziness by many folds.

6. Decorate with a Minimalist Neutral Theme Because Less is More

Image via: carla aston

If you want your room to have subtle tones then decorate with neutrals. They have the prefect balance and thus are not too warm and not too cold.

7. Take Inspiration from Dorm Style and Put The Kids’ Beds Lengthwise

Image via: houzz , houzz

You can take inspiration from a dorm room as well and place the storage beds in a row.

8. Go For a Monochromatic Decor Such as This Serene Green Twin Bedroom

Image via: novate

You can also pick one color and then play with different shades of it in the room like this green bedroom that is just so calm.

9. Decorate with Gray and White and a Beadboard Wall Will Look Just Perfect in Such a Room

Image via: 12 play 4 fun

If you have neutral colored beds for example these gray beds then pair this color with a white wall. But instead of just painting the wall clad it with beadboard.

10. Decorate The Room with Patterns

Image via: houzz

Patterns used in the right proportion always look charming. For example this beautiful girls’ bedroom.

COLOR SPOTLIGHT: BENJAMIN MOORE COVENTRY GRAY

Hi Remodelaholics!  Cyndy here from The Creativity Exchange back with another Color Spotlight.  If you missed my my last post about the most popular black paint colors, you can find that here.

For today’s Color Spotlight, I wanted to highlight one of the most popular mid-toned grays on the market.

 

Benjamin Moore Coventry Gray is an all-star gray that has been extremely popular in the last five years because it’s such a beautiful and versatile color.

Coventry Gray by Benjamin Moore

At first glance just at the paint card, you’re probably thinking Coventry Gray is just another basic gray-nothing special, right?!  Coventry Gray is one of the most versatile mid-toned grays out there because even though it’s a gray, it’s a gray with a lot of depth. Let me just show you!

In spaces with a lot of natural light, Coventry Gray will lean a beautiful shade of blue/gray.

via Matthew Cane Designs

At dusk with a mix of natural and artificial light, Coventry Gray is a stunning and rich slightly warmed gray with slight hint of blue.

 

via CWB Architects

In spaces that do not have a lot of natural light, Coventry Gray will lean more warm gray. A stunning color as well!

 

 

via 12th and White

While Coventry Gray really looks beautiful in almost any light, I think the “sweet spot” is in spaces with a mix of natural and artificial light like this below, where you can really see the richness and beautiful depth of this color.

 

via Benjamin Moore

Coventry Gray is also one the most popular gray cabinetry colors on the market today as well! For great reason, it’s perfection used on cabinets!

 

via Studio McGee

 

 

via Design Manifest

As you can see in the above two cabinetry images, the first image has a lot of natural light, so the color leans a little blue/cooler.  However, in the above kitchen with little natural light, Coventry Gray leans warm gray. I always talk about the sign of a great paint color is if it works well both interior and exterior. As you can see, Coventry Gray looks incredible on the exterior as well!

 

via Driven by Decor

Benjamin Moore Coventry Gray is one of those all-star colors that beautifully works almost anywhere and is a great color to consider!

 

 

Thanks so much for stopping by today and if you’re interested in seeing more beautiful paint colors, I just shared a beautiful new home project that I color consulted on that you can see here on my blog. In that post, I walk readers through our process for choosing paint colors.  You can also find me on Facebook here, where I share lots of paint color inspiration.

Thanks again for stopping by!

Cyndy

Landscaping: 4 Tips to Instantly Improve Your Yard’s Curb Appeal

by Mindy Jensen

 

“Lush landscaping, that’s what sells [houses]. You spend money on trees, and you get it back triple.” –Charlie Munger

The name Charlie Munger may not ring any bells with you, but you’ve probably heard of his business partner, Warren Buffett. Together, they have been making billions of dollars since just about the dawn of time. A little known fact is that Munger made his first million in real estate.

When you buy a house to fix up, you are usually looking at the inside. I drool over the 1970’s and 1980’s kitchens. I don’t think there was an uglier time for interior decorating, and I am oh-so-happy to rip out the old and bring in the new.

My own house was an absolute disaster. The inside was ugly, but the outside was even worse! Horribly overgrown (and some even outright dead) trees and shrubs, patchy scrubby grass and–pièce de résistance–lava rocks. Not the cooler, black-colored lava rocks, the ugly red ones.

Here are a few tried-and-true, easy landscaping ideas that can dramatically alter your home’s appearance.

Landscaping: 4 Tips to Instantly Improve Your Yard’s Curb Appeal

Make a Landscaping Plan

I wanted to keep a unified look in my yard, so I decided on a color scheme–pink and purple because I have two daughters. I went to the lawn and garden department of the big box home improvement stores and found a lot of plants to fit my theme.

Go Vertical

My yard is about 2-1/2 feet above the sidewalk and surrounded by a rock-and-cement wall, which is actually prettier than it sounds. But once I cut away all the dead, dying and overgrown original landscaping  (much of which couldn’t be saved because they were Junipers that cannot be trimmed), I was left with a fairly bare canvas. I wanted to keep some grass, but not very much.

I outlined the front yard with a wavy-edged border to keep it interesting. Next, I added height by filling in the border with mounds of dirt. I covered the whole thing with landscape fabric to try and keep out the weeds, then I placed all my newly purchased plants around the yard to make sure I liked how it looked before I dug holes in the wrong spot.

Use Lots of Color

I live in Colorado. A common misconception about Colorado is that it snows all the time. We are actually a high desert, which means very little precipitation. In order to conserve water, I xeriscaped my property—landscaping that uses little or no water.

I was not very excited to do this at first. I thought I would be stuck with unattractive brown grasses and other plants without flowers, but I found some gorgeous greenery for my yard that is absolutely blooming with color.

My favorite is the Salvia. It bushes out with vivid green leaves and tall stalks of violet flowers. The plants attract bees and hummingbirds to make your yard positively hum.

 

Another favorite are Snapdragons. They come in almost any color you could imagine and produce copious amounts of blooms.

 

Imagine my surprise when I found a purple ornamental grass called Purple Fountain Grass. Of course I bought them, but instead of just winging it, I actually read the instructions for planting them. The teeny plants I bought said to plant them 3 feet apart. I did, but thought they looked silly spaced so far out. I’m really glad I followed directions because these guys got HUGE by the middle of the season!

 

Perennial Favorites and Other Tips

Another thing to think about is how much time you want to spend digging in the dirt every year. While I enjoyed making my yard look great, I was ecstatic when I was finished. I certainly didn’t want to do this amount of work every year. I purchased mostly perennials–plants that come back year after year. I do supplement with annuals  (the ones you have to plant every spring), but my yard is mostly filled with plants I only have to plant one time.

Find plants that do well in your neck of the woods. Advice is only as far as a Google search away. Most state universities have extension programs to help guide you to native plants.

If you want to save even more money, start a bit earlier in the season from seed. Seed packs are far less expensive than plants.

Walk around your neighborhood for ideas. I am not a landscape designer, and I am new to the area. My family takes nightly walks through the neighborhood, and we brought our cameras with us to take pictures of favorite plants. A quick consult with the local nursery told us about the plants and their water needs and matched them up with our general landscape design. The results speak for themselves.

before-after

Our Yard Looks Great, Now How About You?

My house is located in the middle of my street. We have been extensively remodeling it for the last two years. People walk down my street all the time and whenever I am out, I am showered with compliments about the house in general and the landscaping specifically.

I only spent about $700 to landscape the whole property, but I have easily added three times that in value.

[Editor’s Note: We are republishing this article to help out our newer readers.]

What is your favorite plant to add to your landscape? What landscaping tips would you add?

How to Save Money

Confession time – I’m a natural spender. I always knew that I should save money, but I never knew how to save money. My idea of saving money was getting something on sale. Sure I spent $25 that I probably didn’t need to, but I “saved” $75!!

 

In order to get our finances in order and get our debt paid off, I had to go from being a spender to learning how to save money. This transition is not always easy, but here are 5 simple things that you can do to start saving money.

1. Save Your Raise:

Any extra money that you receive that you’re not used to living on, save it before you spend it. This can include any bonus or overtime pay, raises, and tax refunds. Before it disappears and you have no idea what happened to it, put those extra dollars into a high-interest savings account.

 

2. Save Your Spare Change:

Every day or at the end of the week, empty your pockets or coin pouch into a jar and watch the savings grow. Since we use cash for most of our daily purchases, our change adds up quickly. In 2016 we accumulated $160 in loose change which was used to purchase the gifts for our two daughter’s Christmas stockings. Not a bad way to use those coins that would normally weigh down your wallet.

 

3. 52-Week Challenge:

If you’ve spent even a minute on Pinterest, than you’ve probably seen this savings trick. The idea is that every week you save a predetermined amount of money. You start by setting aside $1 on week one, $2 on week two, so that by the time you get to the last week, you’re saving $52. Follow this and when the year is up, you will have saved $1,378.00. There are many savings challenges out there depending on what your goal amount is, and the reason why they work is because the savings goal for each week is a manageable amount therefore making it easier to stick with.

 

4. Pay Yourself First:

Another way to save money automatically is to pay yourself first. If you have your paycheck directly deposited, talk to your Human Resources department and see if they are able to split the deposit so that you have money deposited into your savings account with each pay. You can determine how much you would like sent into your savings. It could be $25, $50, or even 10% of your earnings. Since it’s being put into your savings account right away, you’ll be sure to save it before you can spend it.

 

5. Have a Spending Plan (aka The Budget):

This is the biggest money saver of them all. Set up a monthly budget where you list your monthly income that is expected and deduct the various expenses that will need to come out. From the remaining amount you can determine how much you would like to set aside into savings.

No matter what method or methods you use to save money, the trick is to make sure that you are consistent and stick with it. Happy Saving!!

 

Your Turn!

  • What do you do to make sure that you are saving money each month?

9 Clever Landscaping Hacks for Your Best-Ever Yard

Kill Weeds with Boiling Water

For an all-natural and virtually free way to kill weeds, all you need are a few kitchen basics. Fill a pot with water, bring it to a boil, then dump the water on any offending plants—the piping hot liquid will kill them instantly. This trick works especially well for weeds that pop up in cracks or joints on the patio or driveway, because the hot water could harm neighboring plants, but it won’t hurt the surrounding hardscape.

 

Use Fake Turf to Deter Dogs

Because pets use the lawn as a playground and bathroom, dog owners often end up with torn-up grass with patchy brown spots. But you can have a gorgeous lawn and keep your best friend happy too if you install lush-looking artificial grass in place of the real stuff. The turf will deter dogs from digging, conceal their bathroom area, and prevent them from tracking mud into the house. As an added bonus, homeowners with artificial grass never need to mow the lawn!

 

Plant Over a Septic Tank

Septic tank covers can be a real eyesore in a garden. Instead of ignoring the sewage necessity, try covering it with layer of mulch and beautiful flowers. Homeowners can easily sweep the mulch out of the way to access the tank, and nobody will know what lies beneath the landscaping.

 

 

Use Bulbs to Create Year-Round Color

Many flowering plants have brief bloom times, and some perennials have surprisingly short lifespans, so if you want constant color in your garden, you need to plant vibrant annuals or switch out perennials regularly. For a low-maintenance alternative, plant a mix of flowering bulbs, such as snowdrops and lilies, that bloom at different times. If you rely on bulbs, you’ll have to plant only once each year, and your garden will look great from spring to fall.

Prevent Flooding with a Rain Garden

Surfaces that don’t absorb rainwater, such as streets, sidewalks, and rooftops, can cause water to collect and pool, leading to flooding. You can capture the water runoff and return it to the environment by creating a rain garden, a depressed area in your yard planted with a mix of perennials and native plants. Rainwater will flow toward the garden, where it will nurture the plants and drain into the soil.

 

Fill Your Flower Bed with Pots

To pack your garden with color year-round, purchase pots and fill them with flowers that have different bloom times. Place the pots with blossoming plantsfront and center in your garden. As the season progresses, move the pots around to make the most of the flowers, and swap out pots when necessary.

 

 

Edge a Garden with Pine Board

Giving your garden a well-defined edge keeps things tidy and instantly increases curb appeal, but stone borders are expensive, and flexible plastic edging can be unattractive. A wooden border is a great compromise: Pretreated pine boards are readily available, inexpensive, and easy to cut. Simply outline the perimeter of the garden bed with a shovel or spade, then wedge in lengths of wood to create the edge.

 

 

Pack Planters with Peanuts

Although large, dramatic planters and pots pack a punch in any landscape, they can become inconveniently heavy when filled with soil. Fortunately, most plants don’t actually need that much soil to take root, so you can lighten the load by filling the containers halfway with packing peanuts before adding the soil. The planters will be easier to move around, and you’ll save money on soil to boot.

 

Plant Ground Covers on a Slope

Maintaining a steeply sloped section of lawn can be tricky, because it can be tough to mow and can easily erode from exposure to wind and water. Structural solutions like retaining walls or terracing can be expensive, and most plants don’t grow deep roots fast enough to control erosion. As a solution, try planting ground covers like English ivy, periwinkle, or dead nettle, all of which grow quickly and densely, making them ideal for holding the soil in place.

 

10 Reasons to Get a Fire Pit

On the fence about adding one? Find out the benefits and which type is right for you

By Laura Gaskill

Photo by Michael Prokopchak, ASLA – Discover patio design inspiration

1. Fire pits are crowd-pleasers. Lighting up a fire is a natural way to create a focal point at an outdoor gathering. Whether it’s the hypnotic dancing flames or some sort of primal memory, the fact is that people love to gather around fire. And if you’re looking for an excuse to invite people, all you need to say is “We’re lighting up the fire pit tonight. Want to come over?”

 

Photo by Michael Tebb Design – Look for landscape design inspiration

2. A fire pit doesn’t have to be wood-burning. Wood fires are glorious, and in the right conditions, a wood-burning fire pit can be the perfect backyard addition. But if you have close neighbors or live in an area with restrictions on wood burning, you’re not out of luck. Just make yours a gas or propane model instead of wood-burning.

 

Photo by Urban Oasis – Browse patio ideas

Fire Pit Fuel Options

Wood Fire Pit

  • Pros: Wood-burning fire pits are straightforward to build, with many options available at all price points. If you’re DIY-savvy, you can even build your own.
  • Cons: Wood fires contribute to air pollution, and their use is banned or restricted in some areas. Sparks flying out of the pit can also increase fire dangers; using a protective screen can help minimize this risk.

Natural Gas Fire Pit

  • Pros: Lighting the fire in a gas fire pit is as easy as flipping a switch, which may mean you use it more often. Gas fire pits can often be installed where wood fire pits cannot, such as on decks.
  • Cons: Installation is more expensive and is dependent on being able to connect to an underground natural gas line. Once installed, you cannot move the fire pit.

Propane Fire Pit

  • Pros: Like natural gas, a propane-burning fire pit is quick and easy to light. Some propane fire pits are free-standing and can be moved easily.
  • Cons: You will need to monitor propane levels and haul the (heavy) canister back and forth to the store regularly for refills. Some (but certainly not all) propane fire pits look a bit clunky. It’s not easy to hide a bulky propane tank, and some pits do this better than others.

 

Photo by Outdoor Dreams – Browse patio photos

3. A fire pit lights up the night. All the fancy landscape lighting in the world can’t compete with the flickering blaze of a real fire. Use the warm light emanating from your fire pit to light up a far corner of your yard without having to fuss with electricity.

 

Photo by Tierney Conner Design Studio – Browse patio ideas

4. A fire pit can work in spaces both large and small. Even a compact urban yard or patio can handle a fire pit. In fact, it’s sure to become the centerpiece of a small yard. In a large yard, sprawl out with a big fire pit surrounded by bench seating for a crowd.

 

Photo by Urrutia Design – Discover patio design ideas

5. A fire pit is an outdoor feature you can use year-round. You would be hard pressed to find a backyard feature as versatile as the fire pit. In the summer, roast s’mores by starlight. In fall and winter, wrap yourself in a thick blanket and sip hot cider or cocoa while gathered with friends and family around the cozy blaze.

 

Photo by Hsu McCullough – Browse patio photos

6. A fire pit creates a cozy atmosphere for two. Fire pits aren’t just good for parties, they are equally suited to romantic nights for two. You may be tempted to skip the wine bar when you can sip vino beside the fire in your own backyard as stars twinkle overhead.

 

Photo by Maric Homes – Discover patio design inspiration

7. Fire pits are available at all price points. From simple fire bowls and DIY projects to elaborate custom designs with built-in bench seating, there is sure to be a fire pit that fits your budget. Whichever style you choose, don’t skimp on safety, and be sure to place the fire pit on a nonflammable surface.

 

 

Photo by Michael Kelley Photography – Discover landscape design inspiration

Fire Pit Safety Tips

  • Fire pits should be at least 10 feet from your home or other structures. Some city and county codes may require an even greater distance, so be sure to check before you build.
  • Don’t place a fire pit beneath a tree or overhang.
  • Don’t burn on “spare the air” days if these are used in your area.
  • Don’t put a wood-burning fire pit on a deck. A gas fire pit won’t send out dangerous sparks, making it the safer choice.
  • Educate your kids about fire safety, and always supervise children around an open flame, even when you’re sure they know the rules.
  • Keep a container of water, a hose, a fire extinguisher or all three on hand whenever you light up the fire pit.

 

Photo by Design by Misha – Browse landscape photos

8. You can even use a fire pit to make dinner. Make a backyard campout feel even more authentic by cooking dinner over the open flames. Cooking over a gas fire pit is not advised, but if you have a wood fire pit, you’ve got options: Place a grill rack over the fire to cook above the flames, or wrap up foil packets and tuck them among the coals. Then pull up a seat and dig in. Food always tastes better outside!

9. And, of course, a fire pit is perfect for s’mores. Kids (and kids-at-heart) know that making s’mores is one of life’s great pleasures. With a fire pit in your own backyard, why not make every Friday night s’mores night?

 

Photo by Ward-Young Architecture & Planning – Truckee, CA – Browse patio photos

10. A fire pit may help you sell your home. According to a recent Houzz survey, fire pits are among the three most popular backyard additions by renovating homeowners. In other words, fire pits are hot. Having an attractive and well-maintained fire pit in your yard could give your home an edge if you decide to sell. But once you have that cool new fire pit, you probably won’t ever want to leave.

 

 

The Debt-Free Move

Looking at a big move in your future? Here’s how to minimize debt in the process.

by Chris Sirico

 

 

No matter how you slice it, moving is expensive. The American Moving and Storage Association estimates that the average in-state move cost around $2,300 (and that number increases to $4,300 for a state-to-state move.) But with careful budgeting, research, and a little elbow grease, it’s possible to execute a move without racking up tons of debt. This guide will help you think through the costs you’ll face and how to minimize them as you plan for your move. We’ll cover when to use professional help, planning for the day-of, getting settled in and avoiding financial pitfalls along the way.

Contents

Planning Your Move
Selling Your Old Stuff
When to Hire Help
U-Haul or…? Options for Bulky Items
Case Study: Baltimore to Chicago
Practical Packing Tips
Moving In

Planning Your Move

You’ll be better able to control expenses if you can begin planning weeks or months in advance. Here are some things to consider as you build a moving checklist.

Negotiate an Employer-Paid Move

If you’re moving for work, ask your employer about covering your relocation expenses. You may also be able to negotiate a reimbursed move if your current employer transfers you to a new city. An employer-sponsored move could include container rental, storage, shipping, travel and petty cash.

Save Receipts for a Tax Deduction

You might be eligible for a tax deduction if you are moving for work but your employer isn’t covering the cost. This could be one of the biggest ways to recoup some of your moving expense. Read more on the IRS website.

Move Off-Season

About 60% of moves occur June through October, according to a US Census report.The cost of movers, rental companies and even housing can increase during this peak season. Move during the cooler months to use the law of supply and demand to your advantage.

Minimize Storage and Time Off

Try to avoid relying on renting storage for your things. While you may need a few days (or weeks) of storage, an early start and a little creativity can help minimize this cost. Be sure to sell, donate and toss the things you won’t keep before moving your stuff into storage.

You will need to take some downtime from work, but a head start can help minimize the cost of those lost wages. Chip away at your pre-move tasks a little at a time. Once you’ve moved, give yourself a couple days to get the basics unpacked in the new place, but get back to work as soon as practical.

Moving While Selling and Moving Quickly

Your priorities might shift depending on your circumstances. It makes more sense to pay for storage if you’re showing your house while preparing for a move. It may also make more sense to pay for professional moving services if you need to move in a hurry.

Consider a Balance Transfer Card

If your move will cost more than the cash you have on-hand, you’ll need a plan to keep that debt from costing you even more in interest. Hopefully a costly move brings better financial prospects. But if you need a little time to pay off your moving debt, you might look into a balance transfer credit card.

Balance transfer cards offer attractive terms for those looking to transfer a balance from another credit card. Balance transfer cards usually have 12-, 15- or even 18-month introductory periods with 0% APR. Some also include cash back or other rewards programs you’ll appreciate even after you’ve paid off your balance.

Subscriptions and Services

Don’t forget to cancel your gym membership, cable and utilities. You can forward your mail online ahead of time, but you’ll also need to update financial accounts, online retail accounts and magazine subscriptions.

Get a Tune-Up

The last thing you need during a big move is an automotive breakdown, which could result in very costly repairs on top of your moving expenses. Make sure your vehicle is up-to-date on regular maintenance: oil, fluids, tire pressure and parts replacement. Be sure you have a spare tire with sufficient air pressure, too.

Include Extra Time and Cash for Emergencies

Don’t plan to move in a half day, especially if you’ve hired movers to load your belongings. It’s bad moving etiquette not to be available for the duration of the work.

Think it’ll take 3 days to move? Give yourself 5. The hardest part of planning a move is the unknown unknowns. Be sure to build in some margin for error. There are bound to be a few wrinkles, and moving is stressful enough without feeling like you’re in a time crunch.

Note that these prices are seasonal and show just one example of how these services might compare. Quotes will vary by provider, moving distance, location, dates, and other factors.

The same is true for the cost of your move—it’s likely to cost more than you expect. Have access to cash in case you need more transport capacity, storage time or another emergency solution. It’s normal for unforeseen expenses to pop up. Count on them ahead of time, and you’ll be able to face them more calmly when they do arise.

Pack a Lunch (and a Tent)

A family can spend hundreds on meals and accommodations during a long move. Fortunately, you can take advantage of the occasion to enjoy a few nice picnics and a night under the stars. Pack a cooler of groceries for your drive: sandwich items, fruits, veggies and bottled water are cheaper, healthier alternatives to highway restaurants.

If you’re not afraid of roughing it, a campground can be less expensive than a hotel. My family always looked for KOA exit signs when traveling cross-country.

Selling Your Old Stuff

Start unloading unwanted items by selling online. Sell high-quality clothing at a consignment store or used clothing boutique. Sell or trade in unwanted books at a used bookstore. Use your imagination.

Don’t overlook your own friend base when selling your stuff. Use social media to post about your moving sale and any big items you’re looking to part with. Sell other items in a moving sale that you can promote with signs, social media and a Craigslist ad.

eBay is a great tool for selling small, high-value specialty items. Think of what might not find a fair price on Craigslist—electronics, musical instruments, hobby gear, specialty clothing, or accessories—and list those things.

Of course, there will be some items that don’t sell. Save the unwanted clothes; they’re handy for use as cleaning rags or packing materials when you move out. But donate other items to a thrift store. (Tip: be sure to fill out your donation receipt so you can take a tax deduction on the value of your charitable donation.)

When to Hire Help

How Much Stuff Do You Have?

The scope of the job, the time required, the number of large items, and the type of vehicle needed will all depend on the size of your household. If you’re moving with a lot of stuff – especially several big-ticket items – hiring professionals to transport your belongings safely can pay off.

A DIY Move Isn’t Free

It’s also important to remember that a DIY move isn’t free. You may face fewer out-of-pocket costs, but you’ll still have to spend your own time moving. You’ll have to pay for packing materials, fuel and rentals separately. When you do the work yourself, you also take on the risk of property damage—or worse—injury.

If you plan to enlist friends to help you move, you’ll probably want to at least feed them lunch as a courtesy for their help. Pizza might cost less than the $120–$200 per hour you’ll pay a four-person moving team, but it’s not free.

You Have Options—Hire Professionals for Packing, Loading or Transport

You can hire professionals for packing, loading, transport, or any combination of the three. Professional movers will pay for (or have insurance that will cover) broken items that they packed, loaded and shipped. (See the section on movers insurance below for more information.)

What If Something Gets Broken?

Renter’s insurance may cover damage when moving. It’s worth checking your coverage if you have it. Professional movers usually have a base level of insurance, but it might not be enough to cover damages to big-ticket items. If you’re concerned about loss, consider buying additional movers insurance. (The best insurance, though, is proper packing.)

U-Haul or…? Options for Bulky Items

Sell It!

If you ask a frequent mover how they move cheaply, there is one tip they’re almost sure to share: sell as much of your furniture as possible and replace it in your new city. Only ship furniture and bulky items with sentimental value. Sell and rebuy items from discount retailers like IKEA—they’re cheaper to rebuy than to haul, and they might break in transit.

Friend with a Truck

Let’s say you’re moving a short distance. If you’re like me, your first thought is, “Who do I know that has a pickup truck?” These people are born helpers, bless their hearts. I know pickup drivers who really enjoy helping people move, even if they do get asked a lot. So go for it! Just know there are other options if your truck-owning friends turn you down.

Rent a Pickup

You can rent a flat-bed pickup truck from a home improvement store for less than $30 a day. That’s less than a few cases of limited-edition craft beer you might buy to bribe a buddy. A rental’s truck bed is more spacious than the average pickup, too. A pickup rental is a great option for a one-day, in-town move.

Strap It on Top

I’ve moved mattresses, bed frames, bookshelves and dressers with nothing more than a midsize sedan, a moving blanket and some hauling straps. A set of 4 straps is about $10, and they’ll come in handy for years after your move.

Make sure you know how to use your straps. Get that item tightly secured, and give a couple tugs to make sure it can’t slide backward. Mattresses like to bend upward when they catch wind. To avoid this, strap them down near the front through your front windows and towards the back through your rear windows. (Then you get to hop in through the window like Mario Andretti.)

Rent a Moving Truck

If you do have a lot of furniture that you’d like to hold on to, a rental moving truck might be your default option. Shipping or truck rental is likely to be your single greatest moving expense, so do some comparison shopping before you choose. Factor in the fuel you’ll buy (with mileage as low as 6 mpg highway) and any per-mile cost the provider charges. It is usually possible to tow a car behind a moving truck if you’re moving solo.

Ship a Moving Container

Services like PODS, U-Box and U-Pack are transportation-included moving solutions that deliver a container that you pack. Pricing varies based on the packing volume needed and the distance you’re moving. These services tend to land in a price range at, or above, that of a moving truck rental (see case study below). But you might find that they hit the sweet spot for a small load of furniture that wouldn’t fill a moving truck. Container shippers do include fuel cost in the price. They also tend to offer storage, which might be helpful if you’re dealing with tricky logistics.

Ship with Amtrak

If you’re willing to try an adventurous method to save on moving, consider using Amtrak. You can ship up to 500 pounds of stuff per day, and it costs about 50 cents per pound. That could be a significant savings over traditional methods, but there are guidelines and some damage risk.

Amtrak’s basic shipping guidelines require shipments be in boxes 3′ X 3′ or smaller that weigh 50 pounds or less. Amtrak also ships bicycles, and some stations can ship fully-packed palettes and other large items.

Case Study: Baltimore to Chicago

Here are some quotes from container and truck rental providers for a hypothetical move from Baltimore to Chicago, a state-to-state move of 700 miles. These are summertime prices (peak season) quoted a week out from the beginning of a weekend move (peak days and non-ideal lead time). Bear in mind that this is a worst-case scenario in terms of pricing. Since each container is a different size, estimates are based on enough storage for a 3-bedroom house as defined by each company.

Averages are for illustrative purposes only, based on data from the American Moving & Storage Association Industry Fact Sheet using an average household moving load of 7400 pounds. Costs for all services will vary by location, service provider, size of household and season.

Details

PODS – $2791
(8′ X 8′ X 16′ box; includes transit and 30-day storage)

U-Pack Trailer – $1775
(using 17 linear feet X 8′ X 9′)

U-Box – $2350
(5 boxes; 7’6″ X 8′ X 5′)

U-Haul 26′ Truck – $2443 total ($2009 for Sunday pickup)
(maximum length, 26′ X 7’3″ X 6’10”)
$2170 (but down to $1736 for a Sunday pickup)
+ $273 Gas (6 mpg at $2.40/gal)

Penske 26′ Truck – $2195 total ($1964 AAA rate)
(maximum length, 26′ X 8′ X 8′)
$1922 ($1691 with 12% AAA discount)
+ $273 Gas (6 mpg at $2.40/gal)

Practical Packing Tips

You’ll set yourself back if you have to replace furniture you didn’t take the time to disassemble, glassware you didn’t pad, or a flat-screen TV you loaded loose into a shipping vessel.

Collect used boxes from a grocery store to save on packing material, but ensure each box is strong enough for its contents. Save unwanted clothes and gather newspaper for padding.

There are some packing materials you shouldn’t skimp on. Stock up on furniture pads, moving blankets, and stretch wrap. Get more than you think you’ll need. These tools are a physical insurance policy for your belongings—the short-term expense will prevent expensive replacement costs later.

Don’t wait until the last minute to start packing. Sort through and organize your possessions in the weeks leading up to your move. You’ll have less to pack and load if you can eliminate unused possessions by selling or donating them. You can also ease the days before your move by packing rarely-used items early. Check your attic, basement, shed, and closets to see what you can do without for a couple weeks.

Make sure you fit belongings securely into your truck and within each container. Jostling can cause objects to shift, fall or crush in transit. Bundle items in large groups. First pad with moving blankets or furniture pads between objects and on the outside of the bundle, then fasten everything together with stretch wrap. Secure packing is particularly important if you’re using Amtrak or a container service like U-Pack or U-Box.

 

Moving In and Paying Off

The job isn’t over as soon as you pull in to your new place, and neither are the expenses. Take these steps to make your new life on the other side of your move as affordable as possible.

Ask Around

Your realtor is a great resource in shopping for all the services you’ll need in your new place: TV, electricity, doctors, etc. They’ll be familiar with the area and can probably give you a rundown of popular options.

While you’re at it, make friends with your new coworkers and neighbors. They can point you to the best value at stores, gyms, nightlife and other pastimes in your new neighborhood. Maybe there’s a great park or dollar theater out there. Find out by asking around.

Unpack ASAP

There are a couple of reasons to get your new place set up quickly. For one, you’ll be less tempted to eat out if you have a fully stocked kitchen and a comfortable place to eat. For another, you won’t end up re-buying household items that are tucked away in boxes stacked in your garage.

Re-Buy Housewares and Furnishings on the Cheap

New home, new stuff, right? Maybe not. You can save money on the tail end of your move by shopping judiciously for the things you’ll need. Look for essentials at dollar stores and thrift stores. Check Craigslist for furniture before you visit retail stores. You can always add the bigger, nicer items later.

Space out Home Improvement Projects

No home really feels like home until you’ve added your own personal touch, but the cost of home improvement projects can add up quickly. The key is to prioritize what needs to be done immediately and what can wait. By all means, fix that roof leak to prevent greater expense in the future. The covered patio, however, should probably wait until you’ve paid off the cost of the move itself.

Think through your move ahead of time. Lighten your load by selling and donating possessions. A little creativity and comparison shopping can go a long way to save you money.

 

Buying Your First House: Starter Home or Forever Home?

By EMILY STARBUCK CRONE

 

 

If you’re a first-time home buyer, you may be wondering: Should you purchase a small starter home to get into the market now, knowing you may grow out of it in a few years? Or, should you stretch your budget — or spend more time saving — to get a “forever home” that will take care of your long-term needs?

Here are some factors to consider as you weigh whether to get a home best suited for the short term or the long haul.

Market conditions: Mortgage rates are historically low, but there’s no telling how long that will last. Also, many real estate markets nationwide are booming; consider whether to jump in before home prices get even higher, or whether they may weaken.
Where you want to live: Consider if you’d be OK living for a few years in the suburbs, where you might be able to find something more affordable, or if you’d rather try to snag a home in a different area where you want to live long-term.
 How much house you can afford: It ultimately comes down to how much money you have saved and how much you can afford to spend on a monthly mortgage payment. Use a home affordability calculator to see what’s within your price range.
 What kind of house you want: For a starter home, you might go for an apartment, condo or townhouse in an up-and-coming area. If you’re thinking forever home, a single-family detached or a house with land to build an addition later could be a better fit — but it’ll be more expensive.
The costs of getting out early: If you do spring for a starter house now, and you end up getting married or having kids or needing to move quickly, you may face penalties, such as capital gains tax.

Those are some of the big-picture considerations. Let’s dive into the details on what else you need to think about.

Starter home considerations

Your lifestyle: Do you want to be in the middle of a big city, or are you fine with the ’burbs if that means you can own a home? If you want to live centrally, where real estate is most expensive, you’ll probably have to start small. Dana Bull, a real estate agent in Boston with Harborside Sotheby’s International Realty, remembers when she bought her first condo at 22, she could afford only one well outside of Boston, and she had some regret as she missed being in the city near her friends. Consider what you’re willing to sacrifice, both in terms of location and size.

Your future needs: Bull says many first-time home buyers assume they’ll be in a home much longer than they actually are. She says young, single people sometimes don’t realize how quickly life can change. A job switch, new relationship or new baby can alter what you need in a home.

Zachary Conway, a financial advisor with Conway Wealth Group LLC in Parsippany, New Jersey, adds that selling a house can be stressful — especially if you’re in the midst of major life changes such as having a baby.

So, if your life is full of flux and you think you would stay in your starter home for only 1 1/2 to three years, it may be less stressful to keep renting until you’re ready for something large enough to meet longer-term needs.

Capital gains taxes: If you set out to buy a starter home for the short term, be careful, Bull says. If you sell soon after moving in, you may owe capital gains tax on your profit from selling the home.

According to the IRS, individuals are excluded from paying taxes on $250,000 ($500,000 if married) of gain on a home sale as long as the house was used as your main residence during at least two of the five years before selling it. That means you may want to think carefully about buying a home you’ll grow out of in less than two years. Consult a tax professional to see how this could affect you.

Consider an exit strategy: If you’re considering going the starter home route, you should think through from the start how you’ll offload it when the time comes to move, Bull says. For instance, you might buy a property that you could rent out to cover your mortgage, especially during times of economic uncertainty, she says. This helps ensure you can cover your mortgage payment if you need to move ASAP or if the market is weak when you hope to sell but you don’t want to take a loss.

You should also carefully research the area in which you’re looking to buy, Conway says, and confirm “there’s enough resale potential to make sure that even in a market that’s heading downward, you still have a likelihood of being able to get out of where you are.”

Forever home considerations

Interest rates: Conway says that if you decide to wait so you can afford a forever home, there’s a chance that interest rates could increase from their current historic lows. “You might be able to scrape together some additional funds in the next few years, but maybe at that point, we may be closer back to historical norms of interest rates, and your mortgage is more expensive,” Conway says. Nobody can predict what will happen, but it’s important to keep a pulse check on mortgage rates.

Hot markets: In many major cities such as Boston, property values are rising rapidly, Bull says. There’s also a lot of uncertainty as to whether home values will plateau or keep going up, leaving first-time home buyers wondering if they should give in to the “feeding frenzy,” she says. If you wait in hopes of saving for a larger home, it’s possible prices will rise faster than you can save, she says.

Your cash flow: Considering your lifestyle and life events is certainly important, “but really at the end of the day, it comes down to the math of do we have the cash flow,” Conway says.

If you want a forever home, you have to ask yourself whether you can afford the larger down payment and whether your income supports a higher monthly mortgage payment. Conway says it’s key to create a budget and to carefully track what you save and spend, and to be sure you can afford a more expensive home. Don’t assume your income will be higher in a few years and go for a bigger mortgage, he says. And don’t forget to factor in higher ongoing expenses like property taxes and homeowners insurance.

» MORE: How much down payment do you need to buy a home?

Don’t stress too much

While making the decision between a starter home and forever home is a major move, Bull says don’t fret too much about making the wrong decision. Remember, she says, “there are always options — you can sell, you can rent, you can put yourself in a position where you can go out and buy another house.”

Conway adds that if you decide you’re not ready to buy for a while, that’s OK too, and you shouldn’t look at rent as throwing away money. “I wouldn’t jump into buying something for the sake of the fact that’s what we were told we should do,” he says. “It really comes down to what you’re comfortable with from a cash flow standpoint and what you want in your life. There’s nothing inherently wrong with paying rent.”

DIY Ideas for the Home

JUNE 11, 2017

DIY Home Details
We all want our homes to represent us, these beautiful DIY projects are sure to inspire.

(Today’s features were chosen by Debbie from Refresh Restyle)

 


DIY Library Card Catalog by Sadie Seasongoods

DIY Industrial Pipe Towel Bar by Simply Beautiful Angela

How to make your Furniture Extraordinary with Upholstery Tacks by Just The Woods

DIY Industrial Shelves by Welsh Design Studio

DIY Farmhouse Art by Making It In The Mountains

How to Create a Beachy Colored Look with Paint by Rain On A Tin Roof

25 Tips for First-Time Home Buyers

By EMILY STARBUCK CRONE

Buying a home can be nervewracking, especially if you’re a first-time home buyer. Not only is it probably the biggest purchase of your life, but the process is complicated and fraught with unfamiliar lingo and surprise expenses.

To make the first-time home buying journey a little less stressful, NerdWallet has compiled these 25 tips to help you navigate the process more smoothly and save money.

1. Start saving for a down payment early

It’s common to put 20% down, but many lenders now permit much less, and first-time home buyer programs allow as little as 3% down. But putting down less than 20% may mean higher costs and paying for private mortgage insurance, and even a small down payment can still be hefty. For example, a 5% down payment on a $200,000 home is $10,000. Play around with a down payment calculator to help you land on a goal amount. Some tips for saving for a down payment include setting aside tax refunds and work bonuses, setting up an automatic savings plan and using an app to track your progress.

2. Check your credit

When you’re taking out a mortgage loan, your credit will be one of the key factors in whether you’re approved, and it will help determine your interest rate and possibly the loan terms. So check your credit before you begin the home buying process. Dispute any errors that could be dragging down your credit score and look for opportunities to improve your credit, such as making a dent in any outstanding debts.

3. Pause any new credit activity

Any time you open a new credit account, whether to take out an auto loan or get a new credit card, the lender runs a hard inquiry, which can temporarily ding your credit score. If you’re applying for a mortgage soon, avoid opening new credit accounts to keep your score from dipping.

4. Determine how much home you can afford

Before you start looking for your dream home, you need to know what’s actually within your price range. Use a home affordability calculator to determine how much you can safely afford to spend.

5. Explore your down payment options

Struggling to come up with enough money for a down payment? First-time home buyer programs are plentiful, including federal mortgage programs with Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac that allow loans with only 3% down, plus Federal Housing Administration loans and Veterans Affairs loans. You could also try crowdfunding or asking if family members are willing to pitch in with a gift.

6. Research state and local assistance programs

In addition to federal programs, many states offer assistance programs for first-time home buyers with perks such as tax credits, low down payment loans and interest free loans up to a certain amount. Your county or municipality may also have first-time home buyer programs.

7. Budget for closing costs

In addition to saving for a down payment, you’ll need to budget for the money required to close your mortgage, which can be significant. Closing costs generally run between 2% and 5% of your loan amount. You can shop around and compare prices for certain closing expenses, such as homeowners insurance, home inspections and title searches. You can also defray costs by asking the seller to pay for a portion of your closing costs or negotiating your real estate agent’s commission.

8. Set aside more money for after move-in

Sorry, that’s not all you need to save up for before home shopping. Once you’ve saved for your down payment and budgeted for closing costs, you should also set aside a buffer to pay for what will go inside the house. This includes furnishings, appliances, rugs, updated fixtures, new paint and any other touches you’ll want to have when you move in.

9. Consider what type of property to buy

You may assume you’ll buy a single-family home, and that could be ideal if you want a large lot or a lot of room. But if you’re willing to sacrifice space for less maintenance and extra amenities, and you don’t mind paying a homeowners association fee, a condo or townhome could be a better fit.

10. Research mortgage options

Is a 30-year, fixed rate mortgage a given, or is another loan type right for you? If you can afford larger monthly payments, you can get a lower interest rate with a 20-year or 15-year fixed loan. Or you may prefer an adjustable-rate mortgage, which is riskier but guarantees a low interest rate for the first few years of your mortgage.

11. Compare mortgage rates

Many homebuyers get a rate quote from only one lender, but this often leaves money on the table. Comparing mortgage rates from at least three lenders can save you more than $3,500 over the first five years of your loan, according to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Get at least three quotes and compare both rates and fees.

12. Decide if paying points makes sense

Lenders often allow you to buy discount points, which means prepaying interest upfront to secure a lower interest rate. There may also be an option for negative points, in which the lender pays some of your closing costs in exchange for a higher interest rate. How long you plan to stay in the house is one of the key factors in whether buying points makes sense. You’ll need to do some calculations or speak to a mortgage broker or loan officer to help you decide if buying points is worth it for you.

13. Get a preapproval letter

You can get prequalified, which simply gives you an estimate of how much a lender may be willing to lend based on your income and debts. But as you get closer to buying a home, it’s smart to get a preapproval, where the lender thoroughly examines your finances and confirms in writing how much it’s willing to lend you and at what terms. Having a preapproval letter in hand makes you look much more serious to a seller and can give you an upper hand over buyers who haven’t taken this step.

14. Hire the right buyers agent

You’ll be working closely with your real estate agent, so it’s essential that you find someone you get along with well. The right buyers agent should be highly skilled, motivated and knowledgeable about the area.

15. Stay under your preapproval limit

As your agent shows you homes, look for properties that cost a little less than the amount you were approved for. While you can technically afford that amount, it’s the ceiling — and it doesn’t account for a broken washer or dryer or any other expenses that arise during homeownership, especially right after you buy. Rather than maxing out that amount, set a lower purchase budget to leave yourself wiggle room for unexpected costs.

16. Pick the right neighborhood

Finding the right neighborhood is just as important as locating the right house. Research the schools, even if you don’t have kids, since that affects a home’s value. Look at local safety and crime statistics. How close are the nearest hospital, pharmacy, grocery store and other amenities you’ll use? Also, drive through the neighborhood on various days and at different times to check out traffic, noise and activity levels.

17. Make the most of an open house

Use this as another opportunity to scope out the neighborhood and your potential neighbors. During the open house, pay close attention to the home’s overall condition and look for any smells, stains or items in disrepair. Ask a lot of questions about the home, such as when it was built, when items were last replaced and how old key systems like the air conditioning and the heating are. If several other potential buyers are viewing the home at the same time as you, don’t hesitate to schedule a second or third visit to get a closer look and ask more questions.

18. Buy a home for tomorrow

It’s easy to look at properties that meet your current needs. But if you plan to start or expand your family, it may be preferable to buy a larger home you can grow into. Consider your future needs and wants and whether this home will suit them.

19. Let little things go

When you’re looking at a home, it’s easy to get caught up on superficial details like paint color, fixtures and carpets. These features are easy to change once the home is yours, so don’t let those little details get in the way.

20. Be prepared to compromise

It’s rare to find a house that’s perfect in every way, so think carefully about what you’re willing to compromise on and what you’re not. Perhaps no walk-in closet in the master bedroom is a deal breaker, but an outdated guest bathroom will be tolerable until you can renovate it.

21. Make a strong offer

Your real estate agent can help you with this, but consider how much under or over the asking price you’re willing to pay to obtain your dream home. If there are multiple bids, think about tactics to win over the seller, such as a personalized letter.

22. Avoid a bidding war that blows your budget

In a competitive real estate market with limited inventory, it’s likely you’ll bidding on houses that get multiple offers. When you find a home you love, it’s tempting to make a high-priced offer that’s sure to win. But don’t let your emotions take over; stick to your purchase budget to avoid getting stuck with a mortgage payment you can’t afford.

23. Negotiate

A lot can be up for negotiation in the homebuying process, which can result in major savings. Are there any major repairs you can get the seller to cover, either by fully handling them or by giving you a credit adjustment at closing? Is the seller willing to pay for any of the closing costs? If you’re in a buyers market, you may find the seller will bargain with you to get the house off the market.

24. Buy homeowners insurance

Before you close on your new house, your lender will require you to buy homeowners insurance. Shop around and compare rates to find the best price. Look closely at what’s covered in the policies; going with a less expensive policy usually means fewer protections and more out-of-pocket expenses if you file a claim. Be aware that your insurer can drop your property if it thinks the home’s condition isn’t up to snuff, so you may have to be prepared to find a new policy quickly if it sends someone out to look at the property and isn’t happy with what it finds. Also, flood damage isn’t covered by homeowners insurance, so if your new home is in a flood-prone area, you may want to buy separate flood insurance.

25. Know the limits of a home inspection

Once your offer is accepted, you’ll pay for a home inspection to examine the property’s condition inside and out. But not all inspections test for things like radon, mold or pests, so be sure you know what’s included. Make sure the inspector can access every part of the home, such as the roof and any crawl spaces. Attend the inspection and pay close attention. Don’t be afraid to ask your inspector to take a look — or a closer look — at something and ask questions. No inspector will answer the question, “Should I buy this house?”, so you’ll have to make this decision after reviewing the reports and seeing what the seller is willing to fix.