Painting

Fearless DIYers in a “Flipped” Portland House

Name: Tim and Kelly Fischer
Location: SE Portland, Oregon
Size: 1,650 square feet
Years lived in: Owned 4 years

After making offers on six other houses in Portland’s competitive real estate market, Tim and Kelly and their nine-year-old twin daughters Isabelle and Olivia were thrilled to finally have a home to call their own. The house they bought had just been “flipped” in a style that wasn’t necessarily theirs, but the Fischers saw an opportunity to make the new space the perfect cozy home for their family.

Kelly has great style and is also a fearless DIY-er. She inherited these traits from her mom, who is a multi-talented designer, and the person Kelly calls “a constant inspiration.” The family got right to work removing a main wall of the home to create the open living area they desired. Kelly also took on electrical work in her new home, switching out unattractive light fixtures, and designed and constructed custom furniture and built-ins herself.

Kelly and Tim are avid world travelers, and mementos and photographs from their many trips are displayed throughout their home. “Seeing how the rest of the world lives helps us appreciate what we have, and gives us ideas on how to better utilize our space.” Their cozy Portland bungalow is filled with plants, vintage finds, Kelly’s handmade furniture, and souvenirs from their travels. It feels like a nice place to come home to after a long trip.

Apartment Therapy Survey:

Our Style: We try to fill our home with eclectic pieces. Keeping it simple and neutral, so it’s easier to mix it up with smaller accessories. When we travel we bring back unique things to give our home character and meaning. We like it better when there’s a memory behind something.

Inspiration: Traveling — seeing how the rest of the world lives helps us appreciate what we have, and gives us ideas on how to better utilize our space. My mom has been doing this for years — she is a constant inspiration.

Favorite Element: Our bungalow is pretty tiny so we tore down a wall to create a more open-concept space between the dining and living room.

Biggest Challenge: We have a lot of trouble with our low ceilings and organizing our home to make it interesting, but keeping it low on clutter.

What Friends Say: “There’s always something interesting to look at — unique surprises in every room.”

Biggest Embarrassment: Our house was a flip, and the previous owner installed cheap carpet everywhere.

Proudest DIY: I have two! Our headboard my mom and I made from reclaimed cedar that was originally milled from my parents’ property. The other is the built-in shelving in our living room — I assembled and installed it
myself.

Biggest Indulgence: I’ve spent the most on good lighting, which is, admittedly, an addiction.

Best Advice: Decorating a home doesn’t have to be costly. If you have the resources and time to dig, you will be rewarded.

Dream Sources: If Emily Henderson outfitted my house, I might die.

Resources:

PAINT & COLORS
When we moved in everything was beige- which was fine, but not quite our style. We went with a few light grey shades from Sherwin Williams to keep it neutral and reflect our taste.
“Silverplate” by Sherwin Williams

 

ENTRY/HALLWAY
Industrial bar — Camas Antiques
Bar sign – Letters from Far Away Hood
Reclaimed cabinet – Homegoods
Rustic mirror – Brought back from Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
MCM lamp – Thrift store find
Aiden etagere – World Market
Wood gallery frames – Pottery Barn

 

LIVING ROOM
Ektorp sofa — Ikea
Built-in shelving — Ikea Billy series
Square bar hairpin legs — Modern Legs
Framed watercolor city maps — Summit Ridge
MCM Chairs – Craigslist
Vintage kilim rug – Family heirloom
Sheepskins- Ikea
Throw Blanket- Seek & Swoon

 

 

DINING ROOM
Salt Chair — Design Within Reach
Walnut Dining Table- Craigslist
Faceted Lamp Base- Target
Wood Gallery Frames- Pottery Barn
Emery Linen/Cotton Drapes In Charcoal- Pottery Barn
Chandelier- Brought Back From Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
Stereo Cabinet- Built By Me Using Reclaimed Cedar Siding And Vintage Peg Legs
Mcm Chair- Thrift Store Find

 

KITCHEN
Vintage Locker- Thrift Store Find
Butcher Block- Rescued From A Local Meat Market
Semi-Flushmount Lighting- The Rebuilding Center
Cloche Pendant- Restoration Hardware
Clock- Ikea

 

BEDROOM
Bentwood Pendant — West Elm
Bedside Lighting- Crate & Barrel
Mcm Walnut Dressers- Craigslist And Salvaged
Planter- Atelier Stella Ceramics
Geometric Shelves- My Mom Built Them Using Reclaimed Cedar Siding
Belgian Flax Linen Sheer Drapes In White- Pottery Barn
Mcm Table Lamp- Estate Sale Find
Crescent Mirror- Yard Sale Find
Throw Blanket- Seek & Swoon

 

BATHROOM
Framed Mirror- Ikea
Urban Barn Wall Sconce- Lamps Plus
Threshold Shower Curtain- Target
Stick Collection Painting- Riverluna

Thanks, Kelly and Tim!

 

5 OF THE BEST EXTERIOR HOUSE PAINT COLORS FOR SPRING

Goodbye, dark, primary shades — hello coastal colors and soft neutrals!

BY

Does your house need a facelift this spring? There’s nothing like a fresh coat of paint for instant curb appeal. Of course, a home’s exterior should reflect the style of the inhabitant (you!), but there are a few paint colors that are particularly pretty this time of year.

“It’s important to note that exterior paint color trends don’t shift as often as interior trends colors — exterior paint colors typically are chosen based on architectural style and geography,” says Dee Schlotter, senior color marketing manager at PPG Paints.

With that said, today’s homeowners seem to be ditching dark, primary hues in favor of cool coastal colors and soft neutrals that complement natural materials. Gray in particular is having a major moment because of its ability to blend into any setting, while still seeming sophisticated. First, a few things to consider when painting your house:

•The architecture. “When selecting color for the exterior of a home, rather than focus on what is “in” or “out,” look to colors that are appropriate for the architecture of the home and take into consideration the building materials used on the home,” says Andrea Magno, Benjamin Moore color and design expert.

•The surrounding houses. “I do recommend homeowners consider the neighborhood’s color palette to harmonize best with the environment,” says Sue Kim, Valspar color expert. “It’s best not to choose colors that are extreme, bright and bold to ensure they have a timeless exterior.”

•The power of neutrals. “When applied to exteriors, neutral color palettes can give a home a look of maturity, timelessness and integrity,” Schlotter says. Look for shades that are not too warm and not too cool.

Read on for five paint colors we’re loving this spring.

 

WHITE WITH BOLD ACCENTS

Courtesy of Benjamin Moore

You can’t go wrong with a classic. “To bring in accents of color that reflect your personal style or to add some personality to the exterior, use the front door as a colorful focal point,” Magno says. “Painting a house is a large project, so look to working on a smaller scale by painting a front door, which offers up the opportunity bring in a dash a color that can go a long way.”

Details: Benjamin Moore White Diamond OC-61, accented with Caliente AF-290 door and Harbor Haze 2136-60 shutters

 

BUTTERY YELLOW

PPG Paints

“Subtle yellows have the ability to breathe life into a home and can convey a friendly environment to guests,” Schlotter says. “A warm house is often perceived as more welcoming and family-oriented.” This buttery yellow will make guests feel instantly at home before they even step in the door. For contrast, opt for black shutters and white trim. But steer clear of overly bright yellows or neon shades, as they can easily clash or come off as aggressive and overpowering.

Details: PPG Paints Barely Butter PPG1205-3 house, accented with PPG Paints Blackhearth PPG1003-7 shutters and PPG Paints Sugar Soap PPG1084-1 trim

 

SKY BLUE

Courtesy of Benjamin Moore

“Working with colors inspired by the natural landscape creates an instant connection to the exterior of the home is always a good route to take, plus these colors will endure for years,” Magno says. “Also, the exterior of a house is a much larger scale than painting one room, so think about how a large amount of a color will look to avoid choosing a color that will be overly bright for the neighborhood.” Inspired by and named for the horizon, this pretty pastel blue (on the right) hits just the right now.

Details: Benjamin Moore Horizon OC-53 (right)

 

WARM GRAY AND GREEN

Gray is here to stay, Kim says. “I’ve noticed homeowners desire gray colors that complement their current exterior materials, such as stone or brick. I’ve seen a strong push for warm grays like 5006-2A Wet Pavement, which help balance the natural materials, as well as colorful neutrals like 5002-1B Smoke Infusion, which has a sense of sophistication.”

Details: Valspar 5002-1B Smoke Infusion, accented with 5008-3B Spearmint Shale and 7006-1 Wispy White trim

 

MOODY GRAY

Courtesy of Benjamin Moore

Don’t be afraid to go to the dark side, either. Just keep the trim and surrounding landscaping light and airy, as seen here.

Details: Benjamin Moore Iron Mountain 2134-30 accented with Secret AF-710 trim

Florida Beach House with New Coastal Design Ideas

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Designed by Geoff Chick & Associates and built by Chris Clark Construction Incorporated, this Florida beach house is full of new coastal design ideas! The architectural details are truly inspiring. Walls are paneled with white shiplap and the ceilings, when not featuring shiplap, are beautifully crafted with coffered trim and pecky cypress wood.

Located in 30A, this beach house has a very soothing, relaxing color palette that easily transports you to a sunny summery day.

 

Florida Beach House with New Coastal Design Ideas

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This white beach house is full of great architectural details, inside and out!

Kitchen

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It’s easy to see why this home is being featured on Home Bunch today, right? Who would love to have a kitchen like that? The light gray cabinets are painted in a color similar to Benjamin Moore OC-52 White Dove. Also, notice the gunmetal gray leather counterstools with swoop arms and silver nailhead trim.

Stacked Kitchen Cabinets with Rustic Wood Floors

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The kitchen features light gray stacked cabinets adorned with long satin nickel pulls paired with quartzite countertops and a light gray glazed tiled backsplash. The rustic wood floors are custom dark stained.

 Row of Windows Over Kitchen Sink

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The light gray kitchen cabinets are adorned with extra long satin nickel pulls. A stainless steel dual kitchen sink stands under a row of windows dressed in white roman shades illuminated byRuhlmann Single Sconces.

Dining Room Coffered Ceiling with Pecky Cypress Trim

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The dining room boasts a glossy white coffered ceiling accented with pecky cypress coffers accented with an iron chandelier. The round salvaged wood dining table surrounded by white slipcovered dining chairs.

Lighting is Lowcountry Originals Spring Island Basket – $2,800.00

Coffered Ceiling Details

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The coffers are hollow 2×4 boxes wrapped in sheetrock, with a big crown over the pickled pecky cypress.

Contrasts

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I love the contrast the dark hardwood flooring creates against the white shiplap walls.

Lighting

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Lighting is E.F. Chapman Darlana 6 Light 29 inch, Extra Large Lantern.

Closet Laundry Room

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A pecky cypress barn door opens to a hallway closet laundry room filled with light gray shaker cabinets suspended over a stainless steel mini brick tile backsplash.

Washer and dryer are Electrolux.

 Hallway with Blue Wet Bar

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This hallway boasts rustic wood beam ceiling, shiplap walls, shiplap ceiling as well a wall of French doors and transom windows dressed in white cotton curtains.

Office with Pecky Cypress Barn Door 

 

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One of the pecky cypress barn door opens to reveal a home office with light gray cabinets suspended over a gray built-in desk with wood top.

Barn doors are painted in a custom whitewash stain.

Blue Wet Bar Paint Color

 

 

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A blue wet bar is tucked into a nook. The blue wet bar paint color is similar to Benjamin Moore HC-145 Van Courtland Blue.

Shiplap Barn Door on Rails

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This white shiplap barn door opens to reveal a kids’ bedroom filled with white built-in beds with storage drawers.

Kid Bedroom with Row of Built-In Beds

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The kids bathroom features recycled glass countertop.

Master Bedroom

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What an amazing master bedroom! This space is perfect designed, Notice the shiplap walls and the vaulted shiplap ceiling.

Grey Shiplap

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The shiplap walls are painted in a soft grey color.

Watercolor

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The bedroom features a soft, calming color palette.

Bedroom Lighting

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Lighting is Lowcountry Originals Laurel Bay Shell and Crystal Chandelier – $4,000

Sitting Area

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Gorgeous bedroom sitting area with slipcovered chairs and blue and turquoise accents.

 Oblong Marble Tile Wall

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This master bathroom features an oblong marble tile accent wall, neutral floor tiles and light gray his and her washstands flanked by a drop down makeup vanity. Vanity paint color is similar to Benjamin Moore OC-52 Gray Owl.

Bathroom with Shiplap Walls

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  The master bathroom also features a rectangular tray ceiling accented with shiplap trim.

Height

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Ceiling Height: 12′ ceiling.

Similar Off-White Paint Color

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Best off-white paint color by Benjamin Moore: “Benjamin Moore OC-17 White Dove”.

 Bedroom Hall Sitting Area

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The bedroom hallway is filled with a shiplap wall lined with white slipcovered chairs

Shiplap Wall Paneling Dimensions

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Shiplap walls are 8″ nickel gap paneling.

Gray and Blue Guest Bedroom

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This blue and gray guest bedroom features a gray velvet bed dressed in white and pale blue bedding placed next to a white mirrored 3-drawer nightstand. Nightstand is Worlds Away Ava White Lacquer Nightstand. Similar paint color is Benjamin Moore HC-170 Stonington Gray.

Bedroom Reading Corner

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Inviting reading corner nook with white chaise lounge. Windows are dressed in white cotton curtains.

Bedroom with Gray Quatrefoil Mirrored Cabinet

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This gray and blue beach style shared bedroom features two carved gray headboards on twin beds dressed in white and blue bedding. A pair of blue benches sit at the foot of two beds facing a gray quatrefoil mirrored cabinet tucked under a flat panel tv.

Home Exterior

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Similar white exterior paint color: “Natural Choice SW 7011 by Sherwin Williams”. This property also features a guest house.

Guest House

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A screened-in porch connects the main house to the guest quarters.

  Small U Shaped Kitchen 

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Located in the guest house, this small U-shaped kitchen features a white French hood, stacked white floating shelves, suspended over an induction cooktop with pot and brass wall sconces. A kitchen peninsula is topped with Perla Venata quartzite fitted with a sink and modern faucet which overlooks the family room.

Hardware is unlaquered brass.

Small Living Room

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The small living room features a taupe sectional lined with turquoise blue pillows facing a low wood tv cabinet. A gold striped drum pendant hangs from a tray shiplap ceiling while a pair of wicker pod chair provides additional seating.

Sliding Barn Doors

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Barn doors are Pecky Cypress painted in a whitewash stain.

Sliding Barn Doors

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The pecky cypress barn door opens to a beach style bedroom.

Similar Paint Color

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Natural Choice SW 7011 by Sherwin Williams.

Details

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This coastal bedroom is decorated with a white upholstered bed dressed in green and blue velvet pillows and a small mirrored nightstand. Wall of windows are dressed in white curtains.

  Beach Home Porch with Rope Swing

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The main house features a dreamy porch with a white and turquoise rope swing and a pair of white slipcovered chairs.

On the Beach

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Can you picture yourself spending summers in this home? How fun would that be! 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

15 Chic Ideas to Decorate Your Kids’ Room with Stripes

1. Dress The Beds in Blue and White Striped Bedspreads for a Nautical Look

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Image via: houzz

2. Create an Accent Wall With White and Colored Stripes of Paint

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Image via: hometown feed

3. Dress The Windows with Striped Curtains in Colors That Compliment The Decor of The Room

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Image via: 100 layer cakelet

4. Cover The Floor with a Striped Carpet or Roll Out a Striped Rug

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Image via: hgtv , icons corner

5. Work on The Fifth Wall, Yes We Mean The Ceiling

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Image via: houzz

6. Go for a Striped Bed Headboard and Use The Same Fabric for The Bed Skirt

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Image via: houzz

7. Introduce a Hint of Pattern with Striped Pillows

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Image via: one kindesign , comforter decor

8. Another Way to Add a Bit of Pattern is a Striped Window Valance

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 Image via: homedit

9. Paint A Piece of Furniture in Stripes

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Image via: tomiannie , just a girl and her blog

10. Hang Striped Fabric Canopies

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Image via: houzz

11. Craft a Canvas Wall Art That Has Stripes

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Image via: etsy

12. Set Up a Reading Nook Inside a Striped Tepee

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Image via: project nursery

13. Hang a Striped Pendant Lamp

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Image via: houzz

14. Craft Striped Hot Air Balloons with Paper Lanterns, Paint and Baskets

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Image via: make life lovely

15. Create a Wood Striped Accent Wall

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Image via: design dining and diapers

 

Study: Paint Color Affects House Price

Room painted in certain colors, like creamy yellow or light green, can fetch sellers $1,000 more than expected.

By Mike Chamernik, Associate Editor

Sherwin-Williams-bedroom-blue_1

Photo courtesy Sherwin Williams.
August 10, 2016

Homeowners looking to sell should immediately paint their slate gray walls a new color, according to findings from Zillow Digs, a website where users can browse millions of photos for home improvement and design inspiration.

Zillow Digs analyzed photos of nearly 50,000 homes sold across the U.S. over the last 10 years and determined that a room’s paint color influences the selling price.

The report took into account the wall color and the type of room, with controls for all other wall colors, square footage, the age of the home, the date of the transaction, and the location.

Creamy yellow or wheat-colored kitchen walls were most alluring to buyers, increasing a home’s sale price by as much as $1,360 above the expected Zillow estimate (or Zestimate). Light green and khaki were also popular, with bedrooms painted in those colors fetching $1,332 more than expected. Purple was found to be a nice fit for dining rooms, and homes with mauve, eggplant, or lavender walls earned $1,122 above the expected price.

When it comes to colors that exert a less-than-positive influence on home price, buyers shied away from terra-cotta and orange-toned living rooms (houses with these hues sold for $793 less) and dark-brown bathrooms ($469 less than normal). But slate and dark gray hues were found to be the biggest turnoffs. Homes that featured dining rooms in those colors sold for $1,112 less. Lighter grays, particularly living rooms painted in a dove tone, fared much better, earning $1,104 more than expected.

White and eggshell-color in kitchens, surprisingly, could also have a negative effect on a home’s sale price. Generally a popular choice for designers because of the color’s versatility and clean, timeless appearance, homes with kitchens painted white sold for $82 less than expected.

“A fresh coat of paint is an easy and affordable way to improve a home’s appearance before listing,” said Svenja Gudell, Zillow chief economist, in a statement. “However, to get the biggest bang for your buck, stick with colors that have mass appeal so you attract as many potential buyers to your listing as possible. Warm neutrals like yellow or light gray are stylish and clean, signaling that the home is well cared for, or that previous owners had an eye for design that may translate to other areas within the house.”

Kitchens that Get Black & White Just Right

By Nancy Mitchell

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Black and white is a classic color combo that works pretty much anywhere, but we happen to think it’s especially nice in the kitchen. Here, for your inspiration, are 19 incredibly stylish kitchens that work contrast to their advantage.

Above: Black accents enliven a kitchen from Coco Lapine Design.

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(Image credit: Leva & Bo via La Maison de Anna G)

Black and white and just a bit of color, from Leva & Bo (via La Maison de Anna G).

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(Image credit: Vogue)

Black and white but definitely not boring — there’s tons going on in this kitchen fromVogue. Two kinds of tiles, stainless cabinets, and plenty of art layer together for a space that’s sophisticated but also warm.

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(Image credit: Ollie & Seb’s Haus)

Dark cabinets add drama in a kitchen spotted on Ollie & Seb’s Haus.

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(Image credit: My Domaine)

The lovely kitchen of a Paris apartment spotted on My Domaine.

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(Image credit: Elle Decoration)

White cabinets look nice with a dark countertop in this kitchen from Elle Decoration. The black and white theme is repeated in the rug, and in the subway tile matched with dark grout.

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(Image credit: A Merry Mishap)

Contrast rules in an uber-minimal kitchen from A Merry Mishap.

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(Image credit: Milk Decoration)

Black and white mix in this kitchen from Milk Decoration. The dark cabinets, appliances, and rage hood add drama, while the white-tiled walls feel clean and bright.

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(Image credit: Bo Bedre)

A little bit of contrast is just right for this kitchen from Bo Bedre.

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(Image credit: Skona Hem)

You’ve seen tiled backsplashes, and tile countertops, but this kitchen from Skona Hem has tile (paired with dark grout) absolutely everywhere, for a look that seems simultaneously fresh and also a bit of an 80s throwback.

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(Image credit: Oracle Fox)

White marble and black cabinets in an Australian kitchen from Oracle Fox.

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(Image credit: Emma Hos)

Dark grout ups the style factor in this kitchen from Emma Hos.

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(Image credit: Nuevo Estilo)

Little things make a big difference: this kitchen from Nuevo Estilo is mostly white, but the steel-framed door and black lighting and furniture help to ground the space and keep things interesting.

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(Image credit: The Style Files)

A black and white cement tile backsplash adds panache to this kitchen from The Style Files.

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(Image credit: House & Home)

White marble and black make an unexpectedly delicious combination. Image fromHouse & Home.

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(Image credit: Dustjacket Attic)

Contrast is king in this kitchen from Dustjacket Attic: the traditional molding and the modern kitchen, and the bright white countertops and black cabinets.

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(Image credit: SF Girl by Bay)

A black tiled backsplash adds a bit of style to a kitchen from SF Girl by Bay.

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(Image credit: Residence Magazine)

Black and white (and just a bit of grey) in a traditional-meets-modern kitchen fromResidence Magazine.

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(Image credit: Miss Moss)

Black and white are perfect partners in this kitchen from Miss Moss.

 

Theme Your House Right: 3 Little Things That Affect the Feel Of Your Home

By Toby Nwazor:

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Do you want to live in a beautiful house with well-furnished and decorated rooms? I bet you do. But when it comes to actually turning your house to heaven on earth, it can be a bit of a challenge and often times, a large mess.

Interior decoration is not about slapping colors against the wall hoping it’ll turn out nice. Neither is it only about pushing furniture around. Interior décor is an art. When pulled off properly, it’s a medium through which homeowners can flaunt their personality and lifestyles while at the same time keeping it practical, functional and relaxing. In essence, each room is a reflection of who you are.

A mural hung on the wall in the dining area, or beddings having a particular fabric are carefully calculated so as to encourage the mood or vibe of a room. So, every item vibrates something about you. Get it wrong and you’ll be unjustly misrepresented.

Sounds complicated? It doesn’t have to be.

You can decorate any room in the house to reflect your own style and personality. All you need is to arm yourself with the knowledge of how each item, color or texture affects each room. This post has got you covered.

1. Think Color

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Aside from having a powerful effect in a room, color is just as powerful enough toaffect your mood. In fact, it invokes some psychological and emotional responses which can make you feel a certain way when you are in a room with a particular color. For example light colors make a room look larger, unlike dark colors which give large rooms a more intimate feel.

Put in a dash of yellow which represents happiness if you want to add some cheer in a room.

Home Interior Decoration

Blue and a lighter tone of purple aids relaxation and calm. Green also gives a calming effect to a room. So they often work for a bedroom.

Red and orange increase the vibe of a room. They make people feel excited and energetic. This is why red is commonly used for dining rooms and living rooms.

2. Fabric

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Just like colors, fabrics also affect the feel of a room. Although the connection made with fabric is more physical than visual, it still manages to define a room’s vibe.

Psychologically, silk is normally associated with luxury. Having silk in a room makes the room feel and look rich. The shiny nature of silk aids in reflecting light, as a result, it makes a room brighter.

The real effect of fabrics is at play with curtains when it comes to increasing or decreasing the amount of light in the room. Heavy fabrics like velvet and wool-blends make the color of the room dark no matter how bright the color on the walls are. Since they are thick they make the room warmer in temperature which is not wise choice for the summer.

Light flowing fabrics like lace and chiffon have a reverse effect as they make the room brighter and airy.

3. Wall Art And Ornaments

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As one of the hottest homeware trends of 2016, Julian Charles identified the presence of ethic boho-chic and modern mix can be exemplified with tribal art and ornaments. This comes to show that the type of wall art or ornaments you have in a room can accentuate the theme you have in mind for the room.

Wall art gives a good focal-point especially when the artwork is a large one and makes the room appear complete. Ornaments have a way they tease the theme of a room. Ornaments with smooth surfaces make the room look sleek and classy but aloof. However, ornaments with rougher textures give it a more intimate feel. That is something to watch out for when you consider buying sculptures or carvings.

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Feel free to play around with the colors of artwork and ornaments. For example, bronze or clay ornaments will give the room a cozy feel because of the presence of warm colors like orange, deep brown, or terracotta. The neutral color gray from metallic ornaments can further accentuate a modern themed room.

Working with Wallpapers that have some form of expression of your desired moods isn’t a bad idea either. A bright blue wallpaper depicting vibrant sea life for instance in your bathroom just might do wonders for your mood in the bath.

In the end, it all boils down to your preference. Interior décor doesn’t have to be complicated or messy. It just has to be what you want or the house wouldn’t really feel like home. It’s fun too, once you get the hang of it.

Could the Inside of Your Front Door Use a New Color?

An entrance interior is an often-overlooked opportunity to bring personality into the home. What will you do with yours?

February 8, 2016 – Houzz Contributor

 

Painting the exterior of a home’s front door a distinctive color is one of the fastest ways to add character and enhance curb appeal. But too often that’s where the color stops, resulting in a missed opportunity to carry the improvement into the entry by painting the other side of the door as well. If this is the case at your home, consider extending the exterior door color inside — or select another hue that both coordinates with the exterior while setting the design tone for the entry.

Here’s an entry that’s simply bursting with happy personality, thanks in large part to the color of the door. Just imagine if the door was white —much of the impact and charm would be lost.

 

In this example, the interior side of the door remains white. However, with the door ajar we see the pretty color selected for the exterior, giving us a glimpse of how the entry would read if the sky blue had been continued on the other side.

Crisp white on doors, trim and walls is classically attractive, yet a different kind of appeal is certainly possible when color is extended inside. The pale blue on this door is Farrow & Ball Blue Ground.

 

When deciding where to stop the color, there’s no right answer. Paint just the door, the door and sidelights, or go all out and paint the door, sidelights and trim. Such is the case here, with Benjamin Moore’s Midnight Bluemaking a dramatic statement in this entry.
The deepest shade of navy covers a door surrounded by white paneling here. The color looks fitting with the dark elements of the banister, stair treads and chandelier.
Spots of bright color work well with neutrals. Sherwin-WIlliams’ Mediterranean on the door, mixed with bright blue and lime green accents, creates a cheerful vibe.
The glossy apple green on the door and built-in console is a sleek complement to the warmth and texture of the brick and teak that line these entry walls.
Blue is certainly a popular choice for entry doors, and it’s no wonder. It invokes a sense of calm, and who among us couldn’t do with just a little more of that in our homes?
Red is another top choice: From apple red to the brighter shade of ripe tomato here, it’s a color that brings a sense of excitement and energy.
Here, Al Green by C2 Paint, a sophisticated yet edgy muted lime, stands out among the pale gray walls and white trim.
Benjamin Moore’s Gray, a stunning hue with blue undertones, makes an elegant statement on this beautifully paneled door featuring a brass mail slot. Can a door get any more chic?
A custom yellow green from Sherwin-Williams makes thishollow metal door an understated winner in a modern entry.
And don’t forget the attraction of classic black and white. Benjamin Moore’s Black covers the inside of this front door. Combined with pale gray walls, white trim and a small color accent, it adds up to an especially handsome entry.

Is there a favorite color you’d like to see enhancing the inside of your front door? Painting a door is a fairly simple one-day or weekend DIY job, depending on experience level. Here are the supplies and steps to get you on your way to a more colorful entry:

(Note: The steps will vary slightly depending on the door material and any previous paint, varnish or stain used on the door.)

Step 1. Begin by gathering your supplies: medium- and fine-grit sandpaper, tack cloth, painters tape, brush, adhesion primer and semigloss paint.
Step 2. Lightly sand the door to remove the top layer of varnish, paint or stain and give the surface a “tooth” for the primer to adhere to. Start with medium-grit sandpaper and finish with fine-grit; wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 3. Tape the door edges and any hardware, leaving only the surfaces to be painted exposed.
Step 4. Paint a layer of primer. Consider KILZ Adhesion Primer, designed to bond to a variety of tough-to-paint surfaces.
Step 5. Let the primer dry, then very lightly sand with fine-grit sandpaper.
Step 6. Wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 7. Apply the first coat of paint. This may be enough in many cases, or, depending on the color used, a second coat may be required for optimal results. If so, repeat steps 5 and 6, followed by the second coat.

 

 

Can Paint Color Increase Your Happiness?

Learn how the color choices in your home can increase your well being.

 

When you think of the word “wellness” you may think of a trip to the spa, or the mountains, or maybe wellness is your weekly yoga class. But can wellness be incorporated into your home? What does that mean, exactly? The Random House Dictionary defines wellness as “the quality or state of being healthy in body and mind,especially as the result of deliberate effort.” Wellness and well-being can be thought of as the act of purposefully creating a state of feeling good.

You might already have a wellness room in your home without knowing it. Perhaps it’s the kitchen or the garden where you feel creative, connected and inspired. Maybe it’s the oversized tub where you relax and unwind at the end of the day. It might even be that cozy nook by the window where you love to sit and read. At a recent trip to Heimtextil, design experts from all over the world and across multiple disciplines designed a special exhibition called Well-Being 4.0. They focused on that which makes us feel protected,energized, nourished and enriched. Given these descriptives, you’d be amazed at how right color strategy in your home can influence your well being and help create a stronger sense of wellness for you and your family.

Whether you are aware of it or not, color plays a huge part of your life. From the clothes you put on in the morning, to the foods to buy at the grocery store, to the brands you reach for in the pharmacy, color is influencing you constantly. In fact, brands hire color experts when launching new products or when entering a new marketplace. Experts know that the colors of the package can increase, or decrease, sales.

The colors you pick for decorating your home, inside and out, influence your overall wellbeing too. You’ve probably purchased a colorful trendy paint you saw in a magazine only to realize that in person the color gives you a headache, or makes the room feel dark and depressing. Your very perception of color can really make or break a room, so to speak.

Color experts know that our perception of color (or rather, our perception of light) stems from many core values that have evolved over a long period of time. At the Heimtextil conference I listened as color expert, Carola Seybold, from the color authority company Pantone, explained the psychology of color:

 

Color-experience-pyramid

 

Frank H. Mahnke was a founding member of IACC (International Association of Color Consultants/Designers), which aims to bring color education and expertise into the world of design, including interior design. The pyramid above shows how much influence certain factors, like cultural influences, may have on your love of certain colors.

  1. The strongest influence, Mr. Mahnke describes, is our biological reactions to a color stimulus. Think of the luscious, bright red colors of sweet berries that our ancestors foraged for quick bursts of energy.
  2. Less influential than that but still very strong is our collective unconscious, which would include the examples of orange and red, which signify the colors warmth and security of a roaring fire.
  3. Conscious symbolism – associations is like how children always color the sun yellow, and that we still equate that color with a sunny point of view.
  4. Cultural influences and mannerisms refer to the colors that become symbolic within our own distinct cultures. The color white, for example, represents purity in the U.S., and is used for wedding dresses and baptismal gowns. However in Japan, white is the cultural symbol of mourning, and people wear that color when attending funerals.
  5. The influence of trends, fashion and styles are less important but still may influence our color choices. This is easy and obvious to see, particularly when a photograph of a movie icon on the red carpet spawns a whole industry of new dress designs.
  6. Finally, our own personal relationship to color, although the least influential, is still important. If you’ve always hated the color of orange because you had a bad experience with something that was a dominant color orange in your memory bank, you may never like that color.

Of course, understanding this pyramid of influence is just one part of why we like certain colors in our home. But it’s an important idea to grasp when thinking about how certain colors in your home can make you feel protected, energized, nourished and enriched – in other words, make you feel well.

Color is merely our perception of light, and as we age our perception of color, or our ability to remember color, may change. Hospitals, for example, are experiencing the effect of color with patients suffering from memory loss. In fact, memory and color are closely intertwined. If you don’t find this compelling think about how large parking garages use color to influence your ability to remember where you’ve parked your car. Our brains can only pay attention to small amounts of information at a time, that is exactly why brands rely upon color to impose their brand on your brain.

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The above example by design company Printsome shows just how powerful color can be on our memories. Check out their other brand color-swap examples; what does your mind think when the Starbucks logo is illustrated in Dunkin’ Donuts colors? Does your mind switch brands?

Despite this information about color and memory, Ms. Seybold also mentioned that it may be hard to describe why, exactly, we like a certain color more than others.  Studies have shown that when shopping, 93% of consumers place visual appearance over all other factors. 85% of shoppers say color is the primary reason for selecting a particular product.* Within seconds our brains can recognize a brand before we even register the letters or logo.

So how does all of this help you choose the right colors for your home? How does this help you create a state of well being in your living room, kitchen or home office? It’s important that you go with your gut (your biological reaction) when selecting linens, paint colors or upholstery. Choose colors that makes you and your family feel good and remember that in a room full of furnishings you have many opportunities to influence the overall color palette. You may choose earthy neutrals for your long term investments like carpeting or flooring, and you may want to experiment with “new” colors in the form of inexpensive accessories that can quickly be replaced.

Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute, head of the Eiseman Center for Color Information and Training, and author of nine books on color, understands that feeling good about your interior colors is not necessarily about choosing one color over another. It’s important to play with the right shades and tones for your own home. “It’s a mistake to simply rely on paint swatches,” she says about choosing the right color paint for your walls. Test out paint samples on the wall or on sample boards and live with it for awhile. Take note of how the color changes with the light of day and how it works with the bounced light from your furniture. Ms Eiseman recalled that when living in sunny Los Angeles she loved a particular shade of yellow she chose for her home. When she moved to the Northwest, she still kept yellow as a primary color but had to adjust the shade in order for it to work well with the grey lighting of the cloudy Northwest.

Here are some great tips for choosing the right colors for your home:

  • Take your time. You should never feel rushed when buying fabrics, linens, furniture, carpeting or any interior furnishes for your home. Use Pinterest to create color boards or cut out magazine images.  Putting your gut feelings down on paper is the best way to gain focus and identify how you respond physically and mentally to particular colors or color combinations. Using a professional interior designer can help speed up the process however you still need to know what colors you do, and do not, like. Read more tips for working with an interior designer.
  • Always bring home swatches. Most furniture companies have fabric samples that you can bring home. Not only is this a great way to see how your family reacts to the color, it’s also a great way to see how it works within the room. Read more about samples and swatches here.
  • Don’t choose paint colors in the store. The biggest mistake is to pick out your paint chips in the store without testing it out at home first. Even if you have to purchase a small quantity of paint to test at home, it’s worth the money to paint part of your wall or paint a sample board. This same idea should be used when selecting wallpaper as well.Read more of our painting tips here.

Hire a color consultant. Color consultants are definitely a worth-while investment, especially when you need to make a lot of color decisions at once. If you are repainting the whole home, for example, or building a new home, this is a great opportunity to learn more about the colors you love and how to settle on the correct shades. Find an expert here.

 

* Source: https://blog.kissmetrics.com/color-psychology/?wide=1

Other sources:

International Association of Color Consultants/Designers https://iaccna.com/

Pantone http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/index.aspx

 

Anything but Boring: The Antidote to All-White Kitchens

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White is huge for kitchens right now: white appliances, white countertops, and especially white cabinets. It’s a clean, uniform, and refreshing look — but it’s not for everyone. If you find yourself craving a little color in the kitchen, take a look at this roundup of 11 kitchens with cabinets in any color but white. If you love the look, it can be as close as a paint job away.

Above: We’re in love with the glossy dark green cabinets in this kitchen fromPeppermint Bliss.

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Red cabinets + blue tile = the opposite of boring. From Desire to Inspire.

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Bright pink cabinets in a cheerful space from Beautiful Kitchens.

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The folks at A Beautiful Mess painted the cabinets in their studio kitchen a bright yellow.

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If you love color but are feeling something a little subtler, let this mint green fromA Beautiful Mess inspire you.

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The kitchen in Allison Burke’s Austin home features these lovely green cabinets.

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Green cabinets + black countertops = a fresh, interesting new look for the kitchen. Photographed by Jonas Ingertedt for Elle Decoration.

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Beautiful blue cabinets in Kristin & Michelle’s Austin home.

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Blue cabinets in a classically styled kichen from Domino.

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Blue cabinets, blue walls and a touch of marble are a smart combination in this kitchen from My Scandinavian Home.

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And finally, a navy blue that’s not quite black in a kitchen from Skona Hem.

(Image credits: Peppermint Bliss; Desire to Inspire; Beautiful Kitchens; A Beautiful Mess; A Beautiful Mess; Adrienne Breaux; Elle Decoration; Domino; My Scandinavian Home; Skona Hem)