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THE PANTONE COLORS THAT WILL BE TRENDING IN 2018

From powerful pink to minion yellow, these are the hues you can look forward to seeing in home design next year.

By Kelsey Koss

Courtesy of Pantone

We’re still wrapping our heads around how to use Greenery (the 2017 Pantone Color of the Year) in every single way possible, and already, we have more inspiration to ponder for the year ahead. Behold: The 2018 color forecast is here.

At the International Home + Housewares Show, Pantone Color Institute executive director Leatrice Eiseman revealed what color and design trends we can expect next year, and there seems to be something for just about everyone.

“Metallics we know are classic, but they have really moved over into neutrals,” Eiseman said. She also predicts a continued infatuation with iridescence, since “the human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything pearlized or translucent.

Another standout trend will include a movement to intense colors rather than pastels — music to the ears for bright color lovers.

“Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

Ready to start color scheming for 2018? Read on for the eight palettes you can expect to see next year.

Courtesy of Pantone

Resourceful: A palette made up of complementary blue and orange colors. “This is quite an interesting color combination,” said Eiseman. “It combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at.”

Verdure: Vegetal colors like Celery are combined with berry-infused purples and eggshell blue, symbolic of health, in this palette.

Playful: Think “Minions.” Bright yellow, lime popsicle, and all other things fun come together for this color scheme. “People need to stop and smile,” said Eiseman.

Discretion: Playful’s alter ego. Subtle hues such as Elderberry and Hawthorne Rose offer a new sense of strength. “Pink has developed more power than ever before,” said Eiseman.

Far-fetched: With warm, earthy hues such as Cornsilk Yellow blending with rosy tones, this palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman.

Intricacy: A palette of neutral metallics (AKA, the “new neutrals”) with accents of dramatic Holly Berry red and yellow Sulfur.

Intensity: This is an eclectic mix of colors that evokes a sense of strength, power and sophistication, all balanced with black and gold.

TECH-nique: Bright turquoise, pink and purple colors anchored with Brilliant White and Frosted Almond nod to technology. This palette is all about hues “that seem to shine from within,” said Eiseman.

 

 

 

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Before and After: 13 Dramatic Kitchen Transformations

Many people want to change their kitchen, whether it’s because it functions poorly, their taste has evolved or they purchased a home marked by someone else’s style. In fact, “can no longer stand the old kitchen” is the top reason homeowners choose to remodel kitchens, according to Houzz research. If you’re experiencing kitchen fatigue and are looking for inspiration, take a look at these 13 kitchen transformations. Perhaps you’ll find your kitchen soul mate here.
Wood to White
Many homeowners ditch wooden cabinets in favor of white. Our first group of before-and-afters shows four kitchens where this was done, in a variety of styles.1. Raising the RoofKitchen at a Glance
Who lives here: A professional executive coach and a beer distributor, their 10-year-old daughter and two Pembroke Welsh corgis
Location: Groton, Massachusetts
Size: 251 square feet (23.3 square meters)
Designers: Halsey Platt and Diana MacLeod of Platt BuildersBEFORE: The kitchen in this Massachusetts home occupies what used to be a barn, and the low roof meant windows that were just 12 inches tall.

AFTER: The homeowners raised the roof 18 inches, allowing for bigger windows and a proper view. The remodel also exposed some of the original beams, and added new ones to highlight the space’s historical character.

Cabinets: in English Linen finish, Candlelight Cabinetry; Bakes cabinet pulls and Sheraton cabinet knobs in dark antique: Horton Brasses; wall planking: painted in Mayonnaise OC-85 by Benjamin Moore, Boral; rustic glass pendant lights: Pottery Barn; Iron/Tones undermount sink in white: Kohler; three-legged bridge faucet: Rohl; single-drawer dishwasher with panel: Fisher & Paykel

Read more about this kitchen remodel

What Is a Multifamily Home? A Budget-Friendly Way to Own, Rent, or Invest in Real Estate

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Greg Chow

What is a multifamily home? It’s a building with more than one unit where people can live, each with their own separate kitchens, living rooms, electric bills, and so forth. Also called a multidwelling unit, or MDU, they are typically found in densely populated areas such as cities where space is at a premium. Multifamily homes can be rented, be owned, or serve as an investment property where landlords can collect rent from tenants.

There are around 4 million multifamily dwellings nationwide, compared with 90 million single-family homes. Although living in close quarters with others may not be ideal in terms of privacy or noise, people in multifamily homes generally pay less than those in single-family homes and are taxed with less home maintenance, because a management company may be responsible for repairing the building’s exterior or mowing the lawn.

Types of multifamily homes

Multifamily homes come in all shapes and sizes. Here are some of the more common designs:

  • Duplex: Two homes in one freestanding structure
  • Townhouse: Any number of homes attached at the sides with separate entrances
  • Condominiums (condo): A private residence in a building or community with multiple units
  • Apartment building: Could be up to hundreds of homes in one structure. Unlike the above dwellings, apartment building units are often rented by tenants rather than owned.

 

How to invest in a multifamily home

Buying a multifamily home to rent out (or where you live in one unit and rent out the rest) is a smart financial strategy—today more than ever. The reason: Homeownership is decreasing, recently dipping below the 66.6% historical average.

“That makes it a great time to think about buying investment properties, because people have to have a place to live,” says Daren Blomquist, senior vice president of ATTOM Data Solutions, a property data company based in Irvine, CA.

Unlike house flippers, who invest a little time and tolerate a lot of risk, investors in multifamily housing should anticipate owning the property and playing landlord for decades, advises Blomquist, who owns two rental properties with his wife.

“If you take care of a rental property for 20 years, it will take care of you for life,” Blomquist says. “The goal is very much long-term.”

The trick is to expect the unexpected: You’re likely to experience flaky renters and issues with damage. Consider these factors before investing.

  • Cap rate: The capitalization rate is a formula that indicates the potential return of an investment. Calculate the cap rate by dividing the net operating income (how much you pocket after expenses) by the price of the property. Blomquist would consider a rental property with a cap rate of more than 6% to be acceptable.
  • Expenses: Some multifamily property expenses such as mortgage, taxes, and insurance are relatively fixed; maintenance, however, is always unpredictable. New properties, with appliances and furnaces still under warranty, usually require little maintenance. However, properties more than 20 years old are bound to require new roofs, foundation repairs, and upgraded HVAC equipment. These unexpected maintenance bills can really eat into the profit of investment properties.
  • Turnover: Rarely does one tenant leave and another move in the next day. Blomquist says two months between tenants is common, and that means two months without income likely coupled with higher-than-usual expenses as you repair walls, clean carpets, and maybe paint to make the property more appealing.
  • Your personality: Do you have the patience of a saint? Can you focus on the forest rather than the trees? You’ll need those Zen-like qualities, along with some handyman chops, to succeed in multifamily investing. If your personality isn’t suited to being a landlord, you can always hire a property manager to fix things and find renters. But don’t forget you’ll be charged a fee, usually about 6% of your rental income, which eats into profits.

Garage Floor Solutions

3 Ideas for Updating Your Garage Floor

For many homeowners, the garage is not just for cars anymore. Garages are being repurposed to function as workshops, dens, home offices, supplemental storage space and more.

For most any purpose, however, the original garage floor is most likely not going to suffice.

Check out these three options for transforming you ordinary garage floor.

  • Epoxy Coating — One of the most popular choices is an epoxy finish. It is a relatively easy do-it-yourself project, requiring only a dry, clean surface with no cracks. Just like paint, you can roll the epoxy finish onto the floor. DoItYourself.com has more information on epoxy finishes, preparation (also see this article from the Washington Post) and installation.
  • Interlocking Garage Mats — Even easier to install than epoxy covering, interlocking plastic mats are placed on top of your current floor — cracks and unevenness are not an issue. Depending on the mats you select, these can provide fatigue cushioning, as well as insulation from cold concrete in winter temperatures. For more, visit DoItYourself.com.
  • Concrete Stain or Dye— While upgrading the look of an existing concrete floor with stain or dye is not a project for the average handyman (though DIYNetwork.com offers these instructions), the results can be stunning. Staining generally allows for a more narrow color choice than dying your concrete floor. ConcreteIdeas.com has more information.

Whether you are looking to make your floor less slippery, more comfortable, easier to clean, or simply more attractive, any of these garage flooring solutions will make a noticeable difference in your garage.

Photo from Garage Floor Covering.